Home Poker Tournament How-To Guide

September 25th, , 2: Rather than risk losing their winnings, as one of them would if the game were continued, these two players may be allowed to split the prize proportional to their in-game currency or however they agree. Im not new, but i love a long game, and turbo is out of my comfort zone I need to work on it for sure. Tournaments - For tournaments, you typically need 4 different color chips in order to play a tournament. As I said, these are just examples.

Handling Chips

Seating Players

If you would like your guests to help out with the cost of food, beverage, and other costs, just ask them to bring an additional few dollars exact amount is up to you to help defray your costs. Since you are not asking for money so you can make a profit, this is perfectly ok. Just as I recommend a small buy-in to start, it will make your life easier as a first time tournament host to not have any rebuys or add-ons.

It just makes things more complicated. If there is enough interest from the group, you might allow a single rebuy in the first hour. This can often work out great when you have some real rookies in the group, as that first poker tournament experience can get them very excited to keep playing, but their skills prevent them from doing so. Plus, a single rebuy keeps everyone at the party longer so you can all keep the fun going. Below is a chart that shows how you can expand the prize breakdown as you add more players:.

Poker Tournament Payout Schedule. This is by no means the end-all be-all payout schedule. If you would like more people to take home some cash, go ahead and extend the payout down a few more places. Just be sure that all of the players understand the payout schedule — it is even a good idea to have it posted where everybody can see it.

In the case of two people getting knocked out at the same time, I recommend simply splitting the prize between the two players. Alternately, in the same situation you could award the entire 3 rd place prize to the person who was holding the most chips when he was eliminated, but that can get complicated as it is not always easy to remember the stack sizes once the hand has been played out.

If, at the end of the tournament, players wish to make a side deal in order to split the prize and end sooner, I generally allow it. It is up to the players to decide on who gets what, as it is their money at stake. What you use for chips is up to you. You can go the cheap route and use spare change, you can run over to your local dollar store and get some inexpensive plastic chips, or you can go all the way and buy custom, casino-quality poker chips.

It all depends on your taste and budget. I would recommend, however, to at least get your hands on a good set of Trust me, when you use a chip that feels good, looks good, sounds good, and stacks easily, you and everybody else will have more fun. It will feel like you are playing at a casino. But, again, the choice is up to you. To read more about different types of poker chips , click here for reviews.

As poker chip sets may vary in the colors they contain, I will refer to the chips by denomination, not color. While there are standard colors for each denomination, you might not have those specific colors, so rather than asking you to translate the colors to your own values, I will just list the denominations. That said, there is a chart at the end of this section for the standard chip colors.

You will also want at least four colors. The great thing about this number is that many poker chip sets come with this quantity of chips, divided into four colors. If you want to be sure you get certain quantities of specific colors, you can also purchase chips by the color , generally in 50 or count stacks. It is actually not difficult at all, once you have all your chips together, to figure out how many of each color to give to each player.

Personally, I would opt towards giving each person more chips rather than less, for two reasons: Poker Tournament Starting Chip Counts. As you can see, with each of these options, a count set will be sufficient for a person tournament. If you use a different size starting stack, feel free to adjust the above starting points as needed.

As promised, here is a list of standard poker chip colors. Just make sure everyone knows which is which. Where two colors are listed, it is common to find denominations in either color. Just as there are many different types of chips that vary in look, feel, and quality, there are also different types of playing cards you can use for your home poker tournaments.

The decks of cards you choose can have a significant effect on the poker experience. I highly, highly recommend purchasing plastic cards for use in your tournaments. Most traditional playing cards are made of paper, coated in plastic.

As you may have experienced by using your favorite deck over and over, paper cards are prone to tearing, creasing, fraying, and just otherwise deteriorating. There are many companies who manufacture high-quality paper cards, such as the familiar names Bee and Bicycle, but if you plan on hosting poker tournaments, you are going to want to upgrade to plastic. Unless you actually make it a point to ruin them on purpose, plastic cards will not crease, tear, or warp.

They will even shed spills and can be washed clean with a little mild soap and cold water. I honestly did not believe the hype until I got my hands on a deck of plastic sweetness. They really do make the game feel better. I am not a very good shuffler, and even I can shuffle these cards — plastics have a fantastic balance of flexibility and slickness. For a more detailed review of the most popular types of plastic playing cards, click here to learn about KEM cards, and here to read about Copag cards.

In order to keep the tournament moving, you will want at least two decks of cards per table, so that one deck can be shuffled and prepared for play while the other is being used. You can get by just fine without a dealer button, but they do help to avoid confusion and keep track of who the current dealer is, as well as making your home poker tournament look more professional.

This is placed in front of whoever is sitting in the dealer position. A cut card is a plastic card that is slid into the deck in order to separate it into two sections to be cut.

The cut card then remains on the bottom of the deck so nobody can see what card is on the bottom, in the event that the dealer holds the deck in such a manner that makes it easy for others to peek. If you do not have a cut card, you can use a spare card such as a joker, or more preferably, two spare cards taped together in order to make it feel different than the rest of cards.

You will need some way to time the rounds so you know when to increase the blinds. For lack of a better tool, you can use a kitchen timer or stop watch. If you want to enhance your tournament experience, however, consider buying a specialty timer that not only counts down the rounds, but also keeps track of the blinds and antes for you as well. One such product, Poker Genie, has become popular.

The Genie is a portable timer with a large, bright display that is fully customizable so you can enter your blind structure, round times, and antes. The timer can be placed anywhere in the room for all to see. A less expensive and more versatile option is the DB Dealer digital dealer button, which combines the dealer puck with a basic level timer. It does not show what the blinds are like Poker Genie, but it is smaller and merges two pieces of equipment into one.

There are also programs for your personal computer available to download. Many of these, such as The Tournament Director, offer scores of features other than simply round timing, but the downside to them is that you must have your computer in a convenient location for the software to be useful.

Not only should you go over the tournament and house rules before beginning play, but you should also distribute a sheet of these rules to every table, so everyone has a reference. It is also a good idea, although not mandatory, to create a few large charts for other important pieces of information that can be posted for all to see. Things such as the blind structure, chip values, and payout schedule are helpful reminders for your guests.

No party is complete without refreshments, and your home poker tournament is no exception. Some people like beer, some like soda, some just like water — know your participants. Keep in mind that the tournament might last several hours, so it might be wise to have more than just chips and pretzels available. Pizzas usually work well, as do subs just be sure you have an ample supply of napkins — this is where plastic cards come in very handy.

You can even take a tournament break and grill some burgers let people know if you want them to bring their own meat. And like I wrote earlier, it is quite alright if you would like your guests to pitch in a few dollars for refreshments.

Just make sure they know ahead of time and make sure it is understood that the donations are to defray costs, not to make you a profit. There is no law set in stone as to how you seat the players. If everyone wants to just choose their own seats and you are fine with that, go right ahead.

I would lean against this if you have several people playing whom you do not know, as you never know if they plan on colluding. If you want to seat people randomly, here are a few methods: Assign a number to each spot at the table and then deal one card to each player. The player with the highest card is placed in seat 1, and so on down the line. If two people are dealt a card of the same value, you can either re-deal to them to break the tie or rank the cards by suit. Be sure to announce the suit rankings before-hand.

Pre-select a quantity of cards from the deck, in numerical order, corresponding to the number of people at the table. For example, if there are to be nine people at the table, one each of the values 2 through 10 from the deck. Next, assign a value to each spot at the table and deal each player one of the pre-selected cards. The players then sit at the seat that corresponds to the number they were dealt.

Assign a value to each seat at each table. Using a different deck with unique designs on the back for each table, remove cards from the deck that correspond to the seat values. Place these cards in a box or a hat and have each player draw one without looking.

The players then sit at the table and seat corresponding to the value of the card they drew and the deck it came from leave the decks at the tables so people know where to go. Before the tournament begins, let it be known to all participants at what point you will either move players to fill in empty seats or combine tables.

If you choose to combine tables, simply redraw for seats, as detailed above. If you want to fill-in seats at one table, it is easy enough to deal a card to everybody at the larger table s and have the high card s or low card s move to the empty seats. Setting the blind structure is probably the most difficult part about organizing a home poker tournament. If the blinds increase too slowly, you will need to cook your guests breakfast.

Resources Latest reviews Search resources. For a better experience, please enable JavaScript in your browser before proceeding. Thread starter mummel Start date Apr 29, I'm curious for T10, I have used So I took a spreadsheet and used Blind Valet to calculate a T10, game's blind structure.

I then played around and assumed a 2. Also worth noting that your experiment yielded a stack ratio. Joined Dec 9, Messages 5, Likes 6, Location here and there. This is perfect info generated from first hand experience. I love this forum. Marius L Straight May 1, I was think about the rebuys being: Joined Nov 10, Messages 63 Likes Location 4th and long. What would be the advantage or disadvantage of starting the tourney with a deeper stack say X BBs.

What affect would that have on the game? According to Blind Valet, this is what a T10, tourney's blinds with BB starting stacks looks like. Is this the type of blind progression you're talking about? Time SB BB Ante 1 20 min 25 50 0- 2 20 min 50 0- 3 20 min 75 0- 4 20 min 0- 5 20 min 0- 6 20 min 0- 7 20 min 0- 8 20 min 0- 9 20 min 0- 10 20 min 0- 11 20 min 0- 12 20 min 0- 13 20 min 0- 14 20 min 0- 15 20 min 0- 16 20 min 0- 17 20 min 0- 18 20 min 0- 19 20 min BGinGA - whats your ultimate optimal tourney structure?

How to Host a Poker Home Game: Keep it Simple